Ageless Forever Anti-Aging News Blog

Stem Cell Research May Help Peyronie's Disease

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Similar to other fibrotic diseases, the cause of Peyronie’s disease (PD) is still unclear. This disease is defined by fibrous plaque that accumulates on the soft tissue of the male sexual organ; this causes the organ to bend significantly as well as cause erectile dysfunction, followed by pain and difficulty in sexual performance. Even with the current wide array of medications, procedures, natural remedies, and alternative options available, finding effective treatment of Peyronie’s disease remains a challenge to this day.

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5 Ways to Naturally Boost Your Testosterone

testosterone

 

When you see the term “testosterone,” we typically associate it with masculinity and men. However, women generate testosterone too. So, what exactly is testosterone? Testosterone is a steroid hormone that plays a significant role in the male sperm production and produced in women’s ovaries in much smaller amounts. Rising levels of testosterone stimulates physical and chemical changes for boys and men such as increased muscle, pubic hair growth, deeper lengthened vocal chords, and increased sexual desire.


Testosterone production significantly spikes during puberty and starts to drop after age 30. Having optimal levels of the steroid hormone is essential from puberty throughout adulthood for general health, aids in preventing certain chronic diseases, and increases energy levels. As our levels of testosterone naturally decrease over time, rest assured there are ways to naturally boost it back up.

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Best Ways to Get Radiant, Beautiful Skin

Isn’t it just about every woman’s dream to achieve naturally healthy, radiant and glowing skin? Like Beyonce’s “I Woke Up Like This,” we all want to wake up with a fresh face ready to take on the day every single morning, but sadly it may not be the case for everyone. Is this glowing skin too good to be true? Are we forced to wallow in envy of those glamorous-faced girls in the skin care commercials? Before you jump to throwing in the towel, please note it is actually a lot more attainable and not as complicated as you think. The best long-lasting ways to get beautiful skin is simply through good skin care and healthy habits. The time is now to live your best life with skin you can feel proud of.


Beauty Starts Within

 


We are constantly exposed to environmental toxins like sun, chemicals, smoke, smog, and dust on a daily basis. Unfortunately, a lot of the most popular skin care and cleaning products contain ingredients that are actually harmful for the skin. These factors stress our skin and bodies and will start to become visible over time. Numerous studies have been conducted and have proven skin imperfections such as acne, wrinkles, and dull skin result from stress, bad eating habits, insufficient sleep. If you are affected by these stressors, it is crucial to reset your system from within. What does that mean exactly? Adopt healthier lifestyles we recommend below and you will begin to see a positive change to rejuvenate your skin and even your well-being. 

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7 Best Anti-Aging Foods

As we grow older, we can expect our bodies to go through some significant changes that start from within that will eventually start to show physically. It’s alright, folks...It’s all a natural part of life. What can be done? How can we retain that youthful look? Unfortunately, the fountain of youth is still yet to be discovered, but there are certain things you can do assist you to continue to look and feel young and vibrant including what we put in our diets. Many people dream of reviving & retaining their youthful, radiant skin and although there is no magic pill to immediately transform you, there are things you can eat to bring you closer to your goal. In fact, studies have shown certain foods can slow down our aging process or even reverse effects. We have gathered a list of some great anti-aging foods to put on your grocery list and a few may surprise you! Keep reading to find out more.

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Hematocrit (blood thickness) elevation following testosterone therapy – does it increase risk of blood clots?

 

In discussions about side effects of testosterone treatment, prostate cancer and heart disease get most attention. However, as we have described in several study reports published here in the “Research News” section, the widespread fear of prostate cancer and heart disease is unfounded and not supported by medical research.

The expected potential side effect of testosterone treatment - which in fact is a therapeutic effect in men with anemia [1-3] - is an increased level of red blood cells, known as erythrocytosis or polycythemia.[4-7]  In the context of testosterone treatment, erythrocytosis and polycythemia are used interchangeably to refer to an abnormal increase of red blood cells or hematocrit, which may increase blood viscosity (“blood thickness”).[8, 9]


However, it should be pointed out that technically, erythrocytosis is just red blood cell elevation, while polycythemia involves elevation of red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Using these terms as synonyms can cause confusion. In polycythemia, it is likely the increase in platelets that is the major culprit of blood clots.


Elevated hematocrit is the most common side-effect of testosterone treatment.[4-7] The clinical significance of a high hematocrit level is unclear, but it may theoretically be associated with an increased risk of thrombosis (blood clots).[4]

Here I summarize the results of an analysis of the effect of different testosterone preparations on hematocrit elevations, published in the journal Sexual Medicine Reviews.[10]

 
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Is there a protective role of testosterone against high-grade prostate cancer?

 


Historically, testosterone has almost been a synonym for prostate cancer, and therefore many men have been - and still are - denied testosterone therapy, despite having testosterone deficiency.[1]

A rapidly growing number of studies have challenged the long-standing belief about a putative detrimental association between testosterone and prostate cancer development and/or progression.[2-5] Here I summarize the results of a study published in The Aging Male, which investigated the incidence and severity of prostate cancer in testosterone treated versus non-testosterone treated patients who underwent prostate biopsy.[1]

 
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Effects of testosterone treatment on body fat, lean mass, symptoms and leptin resistance in obese men on a calorie-restricted diet

Effect of testosterone therapy on body composition and leptin resistance

 

It is well-documented that the relation between testosterone deficiency and body fat is bi-directional; low testosterone levels contribute to the development of excessive body fat accumulation, and an excessive amount of body fat contributes to a reduction in testosterone levels.[1-3]

Here I present a series of three reports from a study that specifically investigated if testosterone therapy has beneficial effects on body composition, symptomatic response, adipokines (hormones secreted by fat cells, such as leptin and adiponectin) and gut hormones, over and above caloric restriction alone.[4-6]

 

Key Points

-    Compared to diet alone, combining diet + testosterone therapy results in a greater reduction in fat mass (-2.9 kg) and visceral fat, and a reduced loss of lean mass after 1 year.

-    Dieting men who receive testosterone therapy display higher physical activity levels than dieting men not receiving testosterone therapy.

-    The elevation in testosterone levels by diet alone is not enough to optimize body composition results. Diet alone results in less body fat reduction and more lean mass loss than diet + testosterone therapy. 

-    Diet + testosterone therapy ameliorates symptoms long-term after a diet. Diet alone does not confer long-term symptomatic improvements.

-    Diet + testosterone therapy, but not diet alone, reduces leptin resistance.

 
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Long-Term Testosterone Therapy Improves Cardiometabolic Function and Reduces Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: Real-Life Results

 
Most men with testosterone deficiency need testosterone therapy for the rest of their life in order to achieve and maintain best possible health outcomes. Therefore, studies that investigate the effects of testosterone therapy in real-life are needed, to shed light on adherence and health outcomes in routine clinical practice.[1] While randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are gold standard in medical research [2, 3], RCTs are conducted in highly controlled environments and therefore their results may not carry over to the uncontrolled setting of real-life.[1] It is increasingly recognized that conclusions drawn from RCTs are not always a useful aid for decision-making because evaluating the value of a drug or technology requires an understanding of its impact on current clinical practice and management of patients in a real-life setting.[4]
 
A series of “real-life studies” have been conducted, all showing numerous health benefits of testosterone therapy in testosterone deficient (hypogonadal) men and confirming its safety, with an observation period of up to 17 years.[5-23] Here I summarize the results from the most recent real-life study, published February 9th 2017 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics which investigated the long-term effects and safety of testosterone therapy for up to 8 years in testosterone deficient men attending a urological office.[5] Differences in cardiovascular risk factors and deaths with testosterone therapy were compared to those seen in testosterone deficient men not receiving testosterone therapy but attending the same urological office.[5] 
 
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Exercise – much more than just a calorie burning tool

Exercise is commonly seen as a tool to burn off calories and stored body fat. While exercise has potential to greatly increase calorie burn off and fat burning, as seen in elite athletes [1], studies show that for most people who are struggling with fat loss, dieting – i.e. reducing caloric intake - results in a greater weight loss (or fat loss in some cases) than exercising.[2-5] Why?
 
The problem is not that exercise is ineffective, but that the prescribed exercise dose or adherence to the prescribed exercise dose, is poor.[4, 6] In most studies, the energy deficit produced by the prescribed exercise is far smaller than that usually produced by dietary restriction.[4] In contrast, in studies that carefully compared the effects of an equal energy deficit caused by either aerobic exercise versus caloric restriction, the effect on weight loss is similar.[7-10] In these studies, subjects achieved an identical daily energy deficit of 500-700 calories, created either by diet or by supervised daily exercise, for a 12-week period. Similar weight losses (approximately 6 kg in women and 8 kg in men) occurred in both the diet-only and exercise-only groups.[7, 8]
 
Unfortunately, adherence to exercise programs that daily burn 500-700 calories per session is low and over half end up dropping out after 16 months, despite getting paid for their time.[11, 12] But this does not mean that lower amounts of exercise are "worthless". Here I will tell you how regular exercising – even if your workouts don’t result in large calorie expenditures - helps you stay on the fitness track…
 
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Testosterone treatment is NOT associated with risk of adverse cardiovascular events – the RHYME study

It is well-documented that testosterone therapy effectively restores testosterone levels in hypogonadal men and improves many health outcomes, such as quality of life [1-4], libido [4, 5], metabolic parameters [5-9] and body composition.[4, 5, 9, 10]
 
However, a few conflicting studies raised concerns about the cardiovascular safety of testosterone therapy [11, 12], which in 2015 prompted the FDA to issue warnings to physicians and patients about potential cardiovascular risks of testosterone therapy.
 
In contrast, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) acknowledged the flaws of the conflicting studies and concluded that there is no consistent evidence of harm associated with testosterone therapy, regardless of mode of delivery.[13]
 
Here I summarize the cardiovascular results of the notable RHYME (The Registry of Hypogonadism in Men) study, which contrary to prior clinical trials, enrolled men with a wide range of comorbid illnesses and cardiovascular risk factors.[14] The aim was to evaluate the safety of testosterone therapy in a sufficiently diverse population to reflect real-world, clinical experience.[14]
 
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Dr. Pierce's Medical Organization Affiliations

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