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Ageless Forever Anti-Aging News Blog
Monica

Monica

Medical Writer & Nutritionist

MSc Nutrition

University of Stockholm & Karolinska Institute, Sweden 

   Baylor University, TX, USA

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Effects of testosterone treatment on body fat, lean mass, symptoms and leptin resistance in obese men on a calorie-restricted diet

Effect of testosterone therapy on body composition and leptin resistance

 

It is well-documented that the relation between testosterone deficiency and body fat is bi-directional; low testosterone levels contribute to the development of excessive body fat accumulation, and an excessive amount of body fat contributes to a reduction in testosterone levels.[1-3]

Here I present a series of three reports from a study that specifically investigated if testosterone therapy has beneficial effects on body composition, symptomatic response, adipokines (hormones secreted by fat cells, such as leptin and adiponectin) and gut hormones, over and above caloric restriction alone.[4-6]

 

Key Points

-    Compared to diet alone, combining diet + testosterone therapy results in a greater reduction in fat mass (-2.9 kg) and visceral fat, and a reduced loss of lean mass after 1 year.

-    Dieting men who receive testosterone therapy display higher physical activity levels than dieting men not receiving testosterone therapy.

-    The elevation in testosterone levels by diet alone is not enough to optimize body composition results. Diet alone results in less body fat reduction and more lean mass loss than diet + testosterone therapy. 

-    Diet + testosterone therapy ameliorates symptoms long-term after a diet. Diet alone does not confer long-term symptomatic improvements.

-    Diet + testosterone therapy, but not diet alone, reduces leptin resistance.

 

Long-Term Testosterone Therapy Improves Cardiometabolic Function and Reduces Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: Real-Life Results

 
Most men with testosterone deficiency need testosterone therapy for the rest of their life in order to achieve and maintain best possible health outcomes. Therefore, studies that investigate the effects of testosterone therapy in real-life are needed, to shed light on adherence and health outcomes in routine clinical practice.[1] While randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are gold standard in medical research [2, 3], RCTs are conducted in highly controlled environments and therefore their results may not carry over to the uncontrolled setting of real-life.[1] It is increasingly recognized that conclusions drawn from RCTs are not always a useful aid for decision-making because evaluating the value of a drug or technology requires an understanding of its impact on current clinical practice and management of patients in a real-life setting.[4]
 
A series of “real-life studies” have been conducted, all showing numerous health benefits of testosterone therapy in testosterone deficient (hypogonadal) men and confirming its safety, with an observation period of up to 17 years.[5-23] Here I summarize the results from the most recent real-life study, published February 9th 2017 in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology and Therapeutics which investigated the long-term effects and safety of testosterone therapy for up to 8 years in testosterone deficient men attending a urological office.[5] Differences in cardiovascular risk factors and deaths with testosterone therapy were compared to those seen in testosterone deficient men not receiving testosterone therapy but attending the same urological office.[5] 
 
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